Summer is finally on its way, which means so is the sun! Everyone is excited to get outside and the feel the warmth again, but if you have psoriasis there could be some added benefits to getting out more. Keep reading to find out some of those benefits.

UV Rays have immunosuppressive effects

Psoriasis is an immune disorder where the immune system attacks the body’s own healthy skin cells. This causes them to regenerate faster than normal. Which results in the built-up layer of inflamed and itchy skin also known as plaques. Research suggests that the UVB rays from the sun that only reach the top layer of skin can help ease inflammation in people with mild to moderate psoriasis.[1]

Sunlight helps the body create Vitamin D

It has been found that Vitamin D deficiency is a common factor in people that suffer from psoriasis. One added benefit from the sun is that it helps the body’s natural process of creating its own Vitamin D which is hard to get from diet alone. This will actually help protect the skin and balance the body’s immune system.[2]

Sunlight improves depression symptoms

People that suffer from psoriasis often also suffer from depression. The way you look can play a huge role in your self-esteem and psoriasis sufferers are often self-conscious especially during a flare-up. This alone can cause depression, not including all other stressors from everyday life. The good news is that sunlight exposure can help improve these symptoms.[3]

Now that the sun is out, take advantage of it and get out there! When that isn’t enough to get your psoriasis under control, consider a clinical research study. Stamford Therapeutics Consortium has a clinical trial enrolling now, and we need volunteers. All study-related care is provided at no cost and compensation is available for qualified participants. Click here to learn how you can get involved today: http://www.stctrials.com/currently-enrolling-clinical-trials/#!/study/37.

References

[1] https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320231.php
[2] https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/psoriasis-and-vitamin-d-deficiency
[3] https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/12/01/sunlight-depression.aspx